Dietary vitamin D and prostate cancer

flow1759 By flow1759, 12th May 2015 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Health>Drugs & Medicines

Epidemiologic studies on the association between vitamin D intake and prostate cancer risk have extensively been studied but with inconsistent results.

Dietary vitamin D and prostate cancer

Dietary vitamin D and prostate cancer

Epidemiologic studies on the association between vitamin D intake and prostate cancer risk have extensively been studied but with inconsistent results.

Schwartz and Hulka found in a cross-sectional descriptive study in 1990 that there is an increased incidence of prostate cancer in migrant Asians as they adopt a western diet, that is, lacking the large amounts of vitamin D-rich fish oil found in Asian diet.

In 1992, Hanchete and Schwartz pointed out that men in the United States were ten times more likely to develop prostate cancer than men in Japan, where men consume higher amounts of vitamin D because of their consumption of fatty fish. Furthermore, traditional Japanese men consume higher quantities of omega – 3 fatty acids than their American counterparts. These fats are known to dissociate vitamin D metabolites from their binding protein, thus raising active levels of those metabolites in blood.
Studies evaluating dietary vitamin D intake and the risk of prostate cancer have been conflicting, inconclusive and inconsistent.

In A Swedish population based case-control study, Chan et al found that a high calcium consumption largely from diary products, increases the risk of prostate cancer by lowering the blood levels of circulating 1,25(OH) 2 D. It is the active vitamin D that is thought to protect against prostate carcinogenesis, and the conversion of the precursor 25 (OH)D to 1,25(OH) 2D is inhibited by high calcium intake. But the study concluded that dietary vitamin D intake was not associated with prostate cancer risk. In a Finnish Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-carotene cancer prevention study carried out in 2000 by Chan et al69 to investigate the association between various nutrients hypothesized to influence 1,25 (OH) 2D including calcium, phosphorus, fructose and animal proteins as well as other aspects of diet and prostate cancer risk. The study examined six major food groups (diary, red meat, fish poultry, vegetables, fruits and cereals), the three major macronutrients (fat, proteins and carbohydrates) and concluded that of all the foods and nutrients examined, none was associated with the risk of prostate cancer.
In an Italian case-control study carried out by Tavani et al to evaluate the relationship between calcium, phosphorus, and vitamin D dietary intake and prostate cancer risk, taking into account the potential confounding effects of several covariates in 1294 cases and 1451 controls, found no association between self-reported measures of vitamin D intake (obtained retrospectively) and the risk of prostate cancer. In another population-based case-control study reported by Kristal et al from the United States, associations of energy, fat, vitamin D and calcium with the risk of prostate cancer were investigated in 605 incident cases of prostate cancer and 595 controls.

Self-administered food frequency questionnaires were used to asses diet over 3 to 5 year period and the study reported no associations between dietary vitamin D intake and prostate cancer risk.


These inconsistencies and lack of associations in these studies is largely due to the fact that no vitamin D was assayed for in in any biologic samples of the participants of these dietary studies. Dietary vitamin D status were all retrospectively estimated through dietary recall using food frequency semi-quantitative questionnaires prone to a lot of bias.These studies did not also consider some of the factors that affects vitamin D dietary intake and metabolism such as chronic renal disease.


Various other studies continue to report no associations of dietary intake of vitamin D with prostate cancer risk. But in a double – blind randomized clinical trial in surgical oncology clinics in Toronto, Canada, oral vitamin D3 were given to prostate cancer patients with Gleason scores of 6 or 7 in different doses per day before radical prostatectomy. Analysis of prostate tissue after the prostatectomy revealed high concentration of calcidiol in the prostate tissue which modestly lowered the prostate-specific antigen levels in these patients.


And currently, a clinical trial is been conducted in the United States by the National Cancer Institute using oral vitamin D supplementation in the treatment of prostate cancer which is yielding positive results and is presently at the phase II trial stage.

Tags

Cancer, Cancer Diagnosis, Cancer Fighting, Cancer Prevention, Cancer Risk, Cancer Treatment, Cancers, Dietary, Vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Vitamins, Vitamins And Minerals

Meet the author

author avatar flow1759
I am a vast writer of several specialties, i write articles on freelance for some media houses in my country.

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Comments

author avatar Retired
12th May 2015 (#)

That's interesting to know, I never knew about this.

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
13th May 2015 (#)

Prostate cancer seems more prevalent in Asia now, or might not have been diagnosed earlier.

I have a feeling changing dietary habits have an influence too. Thanks for the highlight - siva

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author avatar Legend
13th May 2015 (#)

Fascinating

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author avatar flow1759
13th May 2015 (#)

Yeah, i will publish something similar soon

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author avatar Retired
16th May 2015 (#)

No one really knows how much diet, the environment and genetics play in causing prostate cancer. It's all speculation.

After I lost my father to a very aggressive form of prostate cancer, I started reading up on it. Some people even believe the failure to ejaculate regularly and the resulting build-up of fluid is a cause of the disease. There is always another study coming along that contradicts a previous finding, and it's hard to know just what to believe.

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author avatar flow1759
18th May 2015 (#)

@ Henry L. Haynes. Sorry over your Dad's demise

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