Help her to Remember

CarolStarred Page By Carol, 25th Mar 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/123u8bv_/
Posted in Wikinut>Health>Mind & Spirit>Alzheimer's & Memory

Daisy is eighty now, and her life is changing at a frightening pace. Her memory is failing her too, and she wants to tell her son Ian, but can't find the words. Read on to find out more

Help her to Remember

Daisy had just had her eightieth birthday. Ian had made it such an enjoyable day, and she knew what a lucky woman she was, he was a son in a million. He had taken her out for lunch at a very nice pub in the country, she had held his arm proudly when they walked in.

Ever since he had been a small boy he had been so caring. Then when Arthur had passed on, he had always made sure she didn't feel neglected. He had his own commitments too, with Jenny and the girls, her two granddaughters.

She was so proud of them , both clever girls, and now one of them was getting married. She screwed her face in concentration to try and remember which one it was. Oh dear, these days she was getting very forgetful, she couldn't remember her name either. Old age was a terrible thing. If only she could tell Ian how hard it was to remember things now.

Ian had noticed a change in his mother

Ian found he was spending more and more time with his mother, he felt he had to because things were not right. She wanted to live independently, which was understandable, her health was excellent for her age, her sight and hearing were still good, but something seemed to be happening to her mind.

He had come to visit her the other day and found the oven on with nothing inside it. Mum had said she was cooking her lunch, but then he found the empty plate, she had already eaten it. She had done other strange things too, telling him that, she was getting tired of her friend Mary because she had found out she was plotting to kill her. Mum had explained that Mary wanted to come and live in her house.

Ian had felt like he was going mad, and didn't have the courage to ask Mary about such a fanciful story. He could only put his mothers delusions down to living on her own and being bored, after all she wasn't stupid. In her younger days, she had been a scientist, a very good one, but since she retired and then lost Arthur, she'd started to imagine all sorts of things.

Jenny was a nurse.

Jenny was worried about Daisy. The more Ian told her about his mother's memory failing, and the funny things she said, the more convinced she was that she knew what was wrong. Having been a nurse for years and working in a geriatric ward, it was all too familiar.

She was used to coping with odd behaviour, and trying to reassure elderly patients that things that seemed to be so real to them, that they found very frightening, were not going to happen. But when it was happening in your own family, it was an entirely different matter.

Daisy, who had been a brilliant scientist, and won numerous awards for her ground breaking discoveries in the past, who would have thought it? She knew that Ian didn't realise what it was, and she had to tell him, because as each day passed , and Daisy's mental condition was deteriorating, it could end up that she would be a danger to herself.

She had gone round to see her after Ian had brought her back from lunch, they often staggered their visits, and he would be at work this afternoon. Jenny had taken her a small birthday cake she had baked herself, intending to celebrate with her by having a cup of tea and a slice of it.

But less than 3 hours after her birthday lunch, Daisy couldn't even remember she had seen Ian. nor that it was her birthday. Seeing the confusion in her eyes, Jenny came to a conclusion, which she knew would very unpopular, but it still had to be done. She would make sure Daisy saw a doctor, and also she would sit down with Ian , and together they would work out together what was best for her future.

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Tags

Birthday, Birthday Cake, Daisy, Doctor, Eighty, Help, Ian, Independent, Jenny, Meal, Memory, Nurse, Pub, Remember, Strange Behaviour

Meet the author

author avatar Carol
I am a proud mother and grandmother, and an author. I have had 7 books published. My hobbies are walking, swimming, and playing badminton. I try to raise more awareness of autism with my writing.

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Comments

author avatar C.D. Moore
25th Mar 2013 (#)

Well done,Carol.

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author avatar Carol
25th Mar 2013 (#)

Thank you CD Moore

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author avatar Stella Mitchell
25th Mar 2013 (#)

Dear Carol , thank you for this write . I too care for my Pastor's mother who is ninety now and bed ridden . She has Alzheimer's and yet her heart is still strong , but for ten years it was difficult to watch the change in my dear friend .
God bless you
Stella

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Yes we cared for my partners's mother until her death last year, it's a tragic disease which robs you of the person, but they now say early intervention can help.

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author avatar Songbird B
25th Mar 2013 (#)

Such a difficult subject for some to face, and such a cruel disease..Well written Carol..A touching article..

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Thank you Songbird

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
26th Mar 2013 (#)

Poignant post, Carol. Alzheimer has no real cure as I understand. I remember an incident regarding President Reagan. He could not recollect that he was a former President of the USA. When his Secretary of State George Schultz visited him, he was the ever gracious host. After Schultz left, Reagan told his wife Nancy - I know him, he is a famous man! We just do not know what turns life takes - siva

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

yes siva, it's very sad.

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author avatar Buzz
26th Mar 2013 (#)

Sad. Thanks for the great share, Carol.

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Thankyou Buzz

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author avatar Djbrat
26th Mar 2013 (#)

How sad, thanks for this ♥

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Just trying to highlight it

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author avatar M G Singh
26th Mar 2013 (#)

A very lovely and touching post.

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

I hope it strikes chords Madan

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author avatar Delicia Powers
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Very powerful....

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author avatar Carol
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Yes it's a difficult subject, thanks for reading Delicia

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author avatar Kingwell
27th Mar 2013 (#)

Thank you Carol, One of my brothers passed away about eighteen months ago at the age of 85, and his dementia was terrible for the last couple of years. He lived with one of his daughters who took excellent care of him. I visited often and helped when I could. Sometimes he would remember things. It's a awful disease.

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author avatar Carol
28th Mar 2013 (#)

Yes I know what you mean Kingwell, sorry to hear about your brother

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author avatar Robin Reichert
24th Jun 2014 (#)

From much personal experience, it's extremely painful to watch a loved one suffer with this disease. With each passing day, you lose a piece of them. Remembering the person they were before dementia/alzheimers is what's most important.

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author avatar Carol
25th Jun 2014 (#)

Very true Robin, thanks for reading

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