How to Run With Asthma and Avoid Attacks

Connie McKinneyStarred Page By Connie McKinney, 26th Sep 2013 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/20ybfqb6/
Posted in Wikinut>Health>General Health>Allergies

Runners with asthma may have difficulty finishing their workouts without getting an asthma attack. Here's how to cope with asthma, breathe easier and enjoy your runs.

Chronic Asthma or Exercise-Induced Asthma


Even some Olympic athletes suffer from asthma. They've learned how to control their asthma and cope with it. I'm not an Olympian but I do have asthma. Let's see how runners can keep running despite their asthma.
Runners usually have one of two types of asthma: exercise-induced or chronic asthma. I have chronic asthma, which is a type of asthma usually set off by allergies. People with exercise-induced asthma have breathing problems brought on by the exertion of exercising. They don't have symptoms in other situations., according to Web Md.
If you experience trouble breathing, wheezing or coughing, see your doctor. Asthma can be controlled by medication and by an inhaler- both of which must be prescribed by a doctor. People like me who have chronic asthma usually can run without any problems as long as our asthma is under control by medication and the inhaler. For more information, see my article on coping with allergies and asthma
Let's look at an overview of why exercise can be a problem for people with asthma

Preventing Asthma Attacks


One way to avoid asthma attacks is to take a puff on your inhaler about 15 to 20 minutes before your workout. This will get your airways open and may help prevent an asthma attack, according to Web Md.
Another way to prevent asthma attacks is to warm up properly. Be sure to walk for a few minutes then do some stretches and then walk a few minutes more. As you warm your body up, you also warm your lungs up. When you've finished your workout, be sure to cool down with some stretches.
For more information on warming up and cooling down, see my article on this subject

Avoid the Cold Weather


Running in cold weather, especially if it's the first time this season, can trigger an asthma attack. To avoid this problem, be sure to wear a ski mask or scarf over your face if you plan to run in cold weather - usually 32 degrees Fahrenheit or below.
Some runners prefer to skip the cold weather and run inside on a treadmill or indoor track. This is OK to do as well. See what works best for you.
If you use your inhaler before your workout, warm up properly and avoid cold weather or dress properly for it, you should be able to run without it triggering an asthma attack. You may not be ready for the Olympics just yet, however.

Here is one I did on running in weather
Here is one I did on running at night
Here is one on stretching:
Here is one on running in the fall
Here is one on hot weather running
Here is one on buying running shoes
Here is one on caring for your feet
Here is one on running a 5K race
Here is one on beginning to run

Attribution


The video came from You Tube.
The pictures came from Morguefile.com
This article used some information from Web Md

Tags

Allergic, Allergies, Allergy Prevention, Asthma Asthmatic, Asthma Patients, Run, Running, Running Advice, Running Tips

Meet the author

author avatar Connie McKinney
I enjoy exercising, pets, and volunteering as well as writing about these topics and others.

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Comments

author avatar Lady Aiyanna
26th Sep 2013 (#)

Start swimming to increase lung capacity and stamina. This will help in keeping you going on the sports field. Say this as a juvenile asthmatic who overcame the whole thing doing this with no inhalers just tablets/liquids back in the day.Only feel the twinge when there is a flu symptom now otherwise no problem whatsoever wherein I run, jump and dance for hours. Change of diet and no fizzies helps.

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author avatar Lady Aiyanna
26th Sep 2013 (#)

This is with experience of 5 people whom I know apart from ME.

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author avatar C.D. Moore
26th Sep 2013 (#)

Well done and very helpful to those with asthma I'm sure.

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
27th Sep 2013 (#)

Great job. I don't have asthma, but my sister does. This advice may also help a runner's parent or running partner.

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author avatar Connie McKinney
27th Sep 2013 (#)

Thanks, C.D. I hope I help people with asthma.

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author avatar Connie McKinney
27th Sep 2013 (#)

Thanks, Phyl. Much appreciated.

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
27th Sep 2013 (#)

a good page indeed..thank you...

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author avatar Connie McKinney
27th Sep 2013 (#)

Thanks, Carolina

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author avatar Delicia Powers
27th Sep 2013 (#)

Very helpful...thanks Connie and well done...:0)!

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author avatar Fern Mc Costigan
2nd Oct 2013 (#)

Thank you Connie for sharing all of these tips. Youre a wealth of information

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author avatar Connie McKinney
2nd Oct 2013 (#)

Thanks, Fern. Hope it helps folks.

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