Is Your Thyroid Making You Gain Weight?

Robin Reichert By Robin Reichert, 20th May 2014 | Follow this author | RSS Feed
Posted in Wikinut>Health>General Health>Diseases & Infections

Thyroid hormones regulate energy levels, body temperature, and weight. So, is your thyroid making you gain weight? Read on. If there are any disruptions or disease afflicting this area, it may cause you to have difficulties with metabolism leading to weight fluctuations - you may either gain weight, lose weight, or may find that losing weight is harder than usual.

Is Your Thyroid Making You Gain Weight?

The thyroid, sometimes called our "master gland," is a small gland, shaped like a butterfly, located in the lower part of your neck. The thyroid gland is responsible for producing the hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), which control metabolism. These thyroid hormones regulate energy levels, body temperature, and weight. So, is your thyroid making you gain weight? Read on. If there are any disruptions or disease afflicting this area, it may cause you to have difficulties with metabolism leading to weight fluctuations - you may either gain weight, lose weight, or may find that losing weight is harder than usual.

The rising incidence of thyroid malfunction may possibly be attributed to our consumption of chemical-laden and overly processed food, heavy metal buildup, electromagnetic radiation, stress, depression, or other emotional issues.

Those with a condition called hyperthyroidism suffer from an overactive thyroid, which causes the thyroid to secrete too much hormone and thus increases a person's metabolism. Most people with hyperthyroidism have trouble putting weight on and may notice weakness, nervousness, rapid heartbeat, increased perspiration, hair and weight loss, and bulging of the eyes.

Hypothyroidism, on the other hand, is the result of the thyroid producing too little hormone. This usually slows the metabolism causing a person to gain weight without explanation. Other common symptoms may include intolerance to cold and fatigue. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can create a general weakness in the body, and may require special treatment before serious health complications arise.

Those who have thyroid problems should avoid foods containing goitrogens. Goitrogens are chemicals that interfere with the level of iodine in your body and thus suppress your thyroid. Foods that contain goitrogens include cabbage, cauliflower, kale, broccoli, soy, brussell sprouts, peanuts, mustard, and turnips.

Foods that support the thyroid include whole grains, organ meats, cashews, clams, oysters, sunflower seeds, beans, poultry, dark green leafy vegetables, cocoa, red berries, tomatoes, and citrus fruits. These foods all contain a healthy supply of thyroid supporting minerals, iron and copper, as well as vitamin C to help absorb the iron. Kelp extracts, sea vegetables, sushi and other foods high in natural iodine are also suggested, especially for those found to have under-active (hypothyroid).

The fats found in coconuts are not harmful like those found in animals. In fact, Virgin organic coconut oil is an excellent source of Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCTs), such as lauric acid (C-12) and caprylic acid (C8). The fatty acids provide consistent energy and aid in regulating the thyroid.

As always, consult your physician or medical practitioner should you have questions or concerns regarding the function of your thyroid gland.

Tags

Hypothyroidism, Thyroid, Thyroid Disorders, Thyroid Hormones, Thyroid Problems

Meet the author

author avatar Robin Reichert
I'm an AFPA certified nutrition consultant, AFPA certified personal trainer, NASM certified youth exercise specialist, as well as an online fitness coach and a professional freelance writer.

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
23rd May 2014 (#)

Nicely written. I see by following you I will learn a lot. Thanks!

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author avatar Robin Reichert
23rd May 2014 (#)

Thanks, Phyl, and I look forward to following your articles as well. :-)

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