Three Myths About Children With Autism

Connie McKinneyStarred Page By Connie McKinney, 13th Jan 2014 | Follow this author | RSS Feed | Short URL http://nut.bz/1o8379ti/
Posted in Wikinut>Health>General Health>Children's Health

Don't believe the myths about autism. Children with autism can grow up to be successful adults with proper support, patience and hard work.

The Challenges of Autism


When parents find out their child has been diagnosed with autism, they often grieve for all the hopes and dreams they had for their child. Parents mistakenly believe their children will never have a successful life. What they don't realize is that there are many myths about autism such as children being unable to make friends. Most children do learn how to cope with their autism and can go on to lead successful lives.
Autism is a complex disorder characterized by problems socializing, repetitive behaviors such as spinning, rocking or finger flicking; and trouble reading verbal and non-verbal cues, according to Autism Speaks. Many children with autism may spend hours lining up toys or stacking cans or other objects. They have difficulty looking people in the eye and may have sensory issues. For example, children with autism may be sensitive to smells, loud sounds or the feel of certain fabrics on their skin.
Keep in mind that some children with severe forms of autism may never be able to live independently and support themselves. Even if they can't live on their own, they can still live meaningful, fulfilling lives.
However, many autistic children can live independently. This goal will take a lot of hard work, effort and support but can be accomplished.

Autistic Children Will Never Make Friends


Autism's main symptom is difficulty socializing, which makes it easy to see how the first myth came about. Many parents mistakenly believe their autistic children will never have friends.
Therapists, teachers and parents can help autistic children learn how to socialize with others. There are several games, activities and role plays which can be done to teach autistic children social skills. I've worked with children who have autism and have used these techniques successfully. I've seen children blossom and gradually come out of their shells - even though this process may take several months or years.

Autistic Children Will Never Have a Job


Many people mistakenly believe autistic children will never grow up and get a job. They see their children struggle to get along with others, attend school successfully and complete homework and chores.
Despite these struggles, autistic children can overcome them. They can learn social skills and organizational skills. Many children with autism learn best by seeing. A chore chart can help them stay on task.
Children with autism thrive on routines but struggle with change. If children have a set routine for chores and homework, they are more likely to complete these tasks.
Parents often forget that children with autism have unique gifts, talents and strengths. Many are gifted in math, science, English, art or music and may grow up to be successful artists, musicians or engineers. What parents need to do is look for a child's strengths, build upon them and encourage them.

Autistic Children Will Never Marry and Have Children


There are a lot of adults in our society who have autism but don't know it. They were never diagnosed. Yet, many of them are married with children. People with autism often find their own ways of coping and navigating through life.
Autistic children first need to develop social skills and empathy. When they are old enough to start dating, talk to them about relationships. Often, once children get the hang of friendships, they progress to dating on their own.
Keep encouraging your child, work with him or her and don't give up. Don't believe the myths about autism. But do believe that your child is capable of growing up to be a successful adult.

Here is an article I did on how to talk to autistic children:
Here is one about Asperger Syndrome:

Attribution


The images came from Morguefile.
This article was based on one I previously published on Yahoo Voices.
This article used some information from Autism Speaks

Tags

Autism, Autistic, Autistic Children, Autistic Children Behavior, Autistic Spectrum, Autistim In Children

Meet the author

author avatar Connie McKinney
I enjoy exercising, pets, and volunteering as well as writing about these topics and others.

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Comments

author avatar Jerry Walch
13th Jan 2014 (#)

This is a very important article, Connie. I have several close friends who have autistic children and I know from experience that what you have said here is true.

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author avatar MarilynDavisatTIERS
13th Jan 2014 (#)

Good afternoon, Connie; sharing this important information. ~Marilyn

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author avatar Connie McKinney
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Thanks, Jerry and Marilyn. I hope this helps and inspires parents of children with autism.

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author avatar Phyl Campbell
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Good points.

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author avatar Connie McKinney
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Thanks, Phyl.

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author avatar Dark-Warrior
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Very informative article,thanks for sharing

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author avatar Connie McKinney
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Thanks, Dark-Warrior. Hope it was helpful.

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author avatar Stella Mitchell
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Such an interesting article dear Connie . There is hope for everybody if we look for it .
God bless you
Stella ><

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author avatar cnwriter..carolina
14th Jan 2014 (#)

so glad you are pointing these out Connie...it is important...I believe these children just have a different reality to what most of us experience...see a lot more and know more on different levels of being..
I do not think it a bad thing more that they are fortunate...sharing...

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author avatar Connie McKinney
14th Jan 2014 (#)

Thanks, Stella and Carolina. Agreed. There is always hope for everybody.

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author avatar Carol
14th Jan 2014 (#)

This is a subject close to my heart, as my son has autism. He also has other difficulties, and yet has made progress over the years, and every little milestone he has reached along the way still fills me with pride, because it's been a real challenge for Phil. I wrote a book about him when he reached 21, doctors said he wouldn't, and now 42, I still have him. I am so glad autism is now recognised more easily, cos like you say,with the right education and help,, many autistic people can achieve so much Bravo!

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author avatar Connie McKinney
15th Jan 2014 (#)

Carol, that's wonderful to hear. I'm so glad Phil is doing well. Support and patience makes all the difference.

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author avatar Fern Mc Costigan
15th Jan 2014 (#)

Excellent and interesting post!

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author avatar Connie McKinney
15th Jan 2014 (#)

Thanks, Fern. Hope it was helpful.

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author avatar vpaulose
15th Jan 2014 (#)

A star deserving post. Thank you dear Connie.

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author avatar Sivaramakrishnan A
15th Jan 2014 (#)

As we are moving towards an inclusive society it is only matter of time where people with autism will also feel part of society and their special talents will be recognized. Thanks Connie for this uplifting post - siva

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author avatar Connie McKinney
15th Jan 2014 (#)

Thanks for your kind words, vpaulose.

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author avatar Connie McKinney
15th Jan 2014 (#)

Thank you, Siva. We often forget that people with autism have many gifts and talents to share. They also teach us many lessons in patience, compassion and understanding.

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author avatar Delicia Powers
24th Jan 2014 (#)

Outstanding much needed article Connie...well done!

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